What Is French Roast Coffee?

French roast coffee is a delight for many coffee drinkers because of its sweetness and great taste. It is a dark roasted coffee that became popular in Europe in the 19th century and until today continues to win the hearts of coffee drinkers all over the world.

Many things make it stand out among other types of roasted coffee, while its natural flavor will leave an exceptional taste in the mouth.

There are many other things you need to know about French roast coffee and why it is the favorite of many. In this guide, we will cover points that clearly distinguish French roast from others.

What Is French Roast Coffee?

Coffee drinkers have testified to the excellent taste of French roast. It’s dark-brown in color and oily surface with natural flavor, although French roast is the most popular and top-selling coffee in Europe – most drinkers are not familiar with its history and how it came about its name.

In an article “The French Roast Explained“, the writer pointed out some facts about the history of French roast which is said to be in existence since the 19th century.

french roast coffee beans

The name “French Roast” refers to the dark-brown color after the coffee beans have gone through roasting processes.

It is also very important to note that French roast is basically the way of processing (roasting) the beans, and has nothing to do with the bean.

So, beans used to make French roast come from various countries like Kenya or Brazil, and can also be a mix of a variety of beans of different origins.

French roast coffee is easy to prepare, but you have to be very good in pressing the coffee to give fine blend. Experts believe the secret to make excellent French roast is in the bean grinds.

Choose grinds that are not very coarse or too fine, but the medium sizes that will not clog nor pass through the filter. The items you’ll need are French press, water, chopstick or spoon, kitchen timer and plunger.

SEE ALSO: French Press Reviews

With precise steps such as what is explained in our guide “How To Brew French Press Coffee” youʹ re going to produce a delicious taste of coffee. You’ll also discover steps to avoid a bitter taste that incorrectly brewed roast could leave in your mouth such as over-extraction.

It is obvious that French roast coffee is unique in several ways and has a very long and interesting history. It remains the delight of coffee drinkers, particularly in Europe and easy to make.

What Does French Roast Coffee Taste Like?

French roast coffee is undoubtedly the most popular coffee in Europe and the rest of the world, obviously due to its finest color and irresistible sweet-flavor taste. Its dark-brown color is quite attractive while you can feel a unique thin watery drink in your mouth.

drinking french press coffee

This coffee is far less acidic when compared to other roasts out there, and in my own view, it is the optimum choice for coffee drinkers who want to cut their consumption of caffeine.

However, I also found it to be the best choice if you crave for a creamy coffee that gives a sweet taste that suits your mood. Though, how you make your coffee can affect its taste, but you can’t deny that a perfectly roasted French coffee will come out lighter and sweeter with an excellent flavor that stands out among other roasts.

French Roast vs Italian Roast

While everyone has a choice of coffee probably because of the taste or color, or even the smoothness, it has been discovered that most coffee drinkers love dark roasted coffee.

French and Italian roasts are both dark in color with an oily surface after the completion of the process.

French roast vs Italian roast

Italian roast is darker, has a strong burnt flavor, and produces much oil as well, while its popularity is greater in Italy than any other place.

Coffee is a complex substance that consists of hundreds of coffee flavors and aromas. We often look for the best coffee before stepping out every morning, and it is common for some people to wake up to the mouth-watering aroma of coffee coming from the kitchen.

However, every household has its unique style of brewing their coffee which may either be French or Italian roast. You may also wonder why there are so many comparisons between the two roasts when they both smell good and taste great.

Is there any difference between French and Italian roast coffee? Well, I think the difference is very little – or not at all.

What many people consider as a difference between the two roasts is the style in which each is roasted and the person doing it. Green coffee beans of different origins, could be roasted and the taste of the coffee wouldn’t be different.

French and Italian roast both release sweet flavor that no die-hard coffee drinker can resist. The process of roasting them is similar – only that Italian coffee is darker and produces a strong flavor.

What To Look For When Buying French Roast Coffee

French roast coffee has become a morning delight in many homes but there are things to look out for when buying it.

The top 2 things you should consider when buying French roast is its oily surface and rich dark color.

It has faded acidity, which may leave a sweet taste in your mouth. While it is very common for coffee buyers to look for smoothness and, of course, the flavor of the products, there are other features on the package label to consider.

So, check for caffeine level in a coffee you are buying because French roast contains no caffeine.

Final Thoughts

With the increasing popularity of coffee spreading all over the world, every drinker has a choice, and I think French roast coffee is among the best available in the market.

It produces an inviting aroma when roasted, and the product gives an irresistible sweet flavor.

French roast coffee can be made using a variety of coffee beans. It is dark-brown in color and has an oil surface after roasted.

It’s quite similar to Italian roast coffee, but the latter is darker and popular among Italian drinkers.

You should consider buying a quality French roast coffee by checking for its features which can be seen written on the package label and you should always remember that its taste makes a difference.

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